🎀 Time to Check Your Tits!

Did you know that breastfeeding lowers your risk for breast cancer? Breastfeeding reduces your risks of breast cancer; which is why it’s even more important for Black women to be empowered to breastfeed because Black women also often suffer from higher rates of more invasive and late stage breast cancer.


gif


But it’s still a good idea to monitor for breast and nipple changes. If you’ve noticed a dimpling on your skin that’s similar to the texture of an orange rind, you may be rightfully so perplexed.



gif


Let’s talk about Peau D’Orange 🍊


One change that requires immediate medical evaluation is Peau D’orange which is thickened skin with large pores. It is a term used by medical professionals to describe a rough, bumpy, pitted skin appearance on an inflamed breast.



gif


Translated from French to mean “skin of an orange”, because it looks like a navel orange peel. This can be caused by an infection in your breast or inflammatory breast cancer. Please see your health care provider right away.

Unfortunately, many of the symptoms of mastitis, aside from fever, are very similar to inflammatory breast cancer. Such as:

  • Redness of the breast that comes and goes.

  • Swelling of the breast: Part of or all of the breast may be swollen, enlarged, and hard.

  • Orange-peel appearance: Your breast may swell and start to look like the peel of a navel orange

  • Swelling of lymph nodes: The lymph nodes under your arm or above the collarbone may be swollen.

  • Flattening or inversion of the nipple: The nipple may go flat or turn inward.

  • Other skin changes: The skin of the breast might look pink or bruised, or you may have what looks like ridges, welts, or hives on your breast.

Fortunately, inflammatory breast cancer is also very rare, and makes up only about 1% of all breast cancer cases each year. However, if you are taking antibiotics for your mastitis and your symptoms haven’t resolved within 4 - 5weeks, a full medical investigation should be conducted  to rule out inflammatory breast cancer.


Peau d’orange on the breast doesn’t mean you for sure have breast cancer, but it could be a sign worth investigating as it may be a symptom of inflammatory breast cancer. It’s very important to see your doctor if you believe you have peau d’orange on your breast.


Quick tip: One of the best times to self check is around the beginning and end of your cycle when breast changes occur due to hormonal fluctuations. You can check while you’re in the shower to save time and use the soap to massage around, don’t forget up into the armpit. Always go to your annual well exams for a proper breast exam.


Happy Mammogram Season!


gif


Do you self check your tits?

  • 0%Yep

  • 0%Nope

  • 0%I will now!


Sources:


https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22856439/


https://www.breastcancerspecialist.com.au/symptoms-conditions/skin-changes


https://www.healthline.com/health/breast-cancer/peau-d-orange



1 view0 comments